The Uniform Child Custody Jurisdiction Enforcement Act (UCCJEA) was created to help prevent one parent from going to a different state with the couple’s children and then filing a custody action. Under the Uniform Child Custody Jurisdiction Enforcement Act, the court will look to see which state the child resided in and was the child’s home state during the previous six months to determine whether the court in a particular state has authority and jurisdiction to make court orders over the parties and their children.

The courts also look at 1) whether another state could also have jurisdiction over the child under the act, 2) whether the parent and the child have a significant connection to the state, and 3) whether the majority of witnesses and the evidence are in the state.

The Uniform Child Custody Jurisdiction Enforcement Act governs the ability of state courts to have jurisdiction and make and modify/change child custody and visitation orders. It also gives State courts the ability to enforce valid child custody and visitation orders made by made by sister State courts. It is important to note, however, that the Uniform Child Custody Jurisdiction Enforcement Act does not apply to child support cases.