Assets that are solely in the name of the decedent are generally probate assets. Assets that can transferred through pay-on-death provisions are not considered probate assets. For example, if an asset is owned in joint tenancy (but not if it is owned in tenancy in common) or there is a named beneficiary designated to receive the asset after death of the owner, these assets are not part of the probate state. When pay-on-death designations have been made, the asset avoids probate. All other assets are part of the estate and must be probated in California if the total value exceeds $150,000.  If there is a surviving spouse, however, a formal probate can usually be avoided with a spousal property petition.